Young minds require a solid foundation of knowledge to support future learning. Our Elementary School is designed to excite students, instilling a love of learning and priming them for success at an early age.

Grade One


At Metropolitan School we know that the most effective and successful first grade classrooms are those which are very positive places, as we know that encouraging success is critical in first grade classrooms as first grade is a year of important transitions for students as they move away from the play of prekindergarten and kindergarten toward a more traditional elementary school classroom with tables and desks where students spend more of their time.  First graders at Metropolitan School start the school year as beginning readers and writers and progress through the year to become beginner readers and writers, as they read and write more with greater comprehension and ability.

What will grade one students learn in English Language Arts?

In grade one, students build important reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Students will continue to learn the letters and sounds that make up words. They will think, talk, and write about what they read in stories, articles, and other sources of information.  In their writing, students will work on putting together clear sentences on a range of topics using a growing vocabulary.

Students in grade one read stories and poems. Additionally, they read to learn information about history, the world, science, and other areas. Here are just a few examples of how Metropolitan School students develop important reading and writing skills:

Reading

  • – Students retell stories, including key details, and show that they -understand the lesson or moral of a story
  • – Students identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.
  • – Students ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • – Students use the illustrations and details in a text to describe key ideas.

Writing

  • – Students name a topic and supply some facts about the topic.
  • – Students provide some sense of closure.

What will grade one students learn in mathematics?

In grade one, students will work with whole numbers and place value— including grouping numbers into tens and ones as they learn to add and subtract up through 20. Students will also use charts, tables, and diagrams to solve problems. Activities in these areas will include:

  • – Quickly and accurately adding numbers together that total up to 10 or less and subtracting from numbers up through 10
  • – Understanding the rules of addition and subtraction (for example, 5+2=2+5)
  • – Solving word problems that involve adding or subtracting numbers up through 20
  • – Understanding what the different digits mean in two-digit numbers (place value)
  • – Comparing two-digit numbers using the symbols > (more than), = (equal to) , and < (less than)
  • – Understanding the meaning of the equal sign (=) and determining if statements involving addition and subtraction are true or false (for example, which of the following statements are true? 3+3=6, 4+1=5+2)
  • – Adding one- and two-digit numbers together
  • – Measuring the lengths of objects using a shorter object as a unit of length
  • – Putting objects in order from longest to shortest or shortest to longest
  • – Organizing objects into categories and comparing the number of objects in different categories
  • – Dividing circles and rectangles into halves and quarters

What learning experiences do grade one students have with science, social studies, and specialist subjects?

Social studies and science learning activities for students in grade one continue to be integrated with English language arts and mathematics through our theme-based approach to teaching and learning at within a homeroom setting while specialist subject instruction in physical education, art, music, and French, as well as Arabic and religion studies as prescribed by Egypt Ministry of Education is taught in specialist classroom settings.

Grade Two


Second grade is an important year for students as they solidify their reading skills in preparation for grade three when they will begin the transition from “learning to read” to “reading to learn”.  Our goal for students in grade two at Metropolitan School is to provide learning experiences that will enable students to become confident beginner readers and writers. Through an enriched vocabulary and stronger reading comprehension skills, equipping them to derive meaning from increasingly challenging, and diverse, subject matter and course content.

What will grade two students learn in English language arts?

Metropolitan School grade two students will continue to build important reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. They will think, talk, and write about what they read in a variety of texts. In their writing, students will learn how to develop a topic and strengthen their skills by editing and revising. Activities in these areas will include:

  • – Reading stories, including fables and folktales from different cultures, and identifying the lesson or moral of the story
  • – Reading texts about history, social studies, or science and identifying the main idea
  • – Answering who, what, where, when, why, and how questions
  • – Learning and using new words
  • – Learning the rules of spoken and written English
  • – Participating in class discussions by listening and building on what others are saying
  • – Describing in their own words information learned from articles or books read aloud
  • – Working together to gather facts and information on a topic
  • – Writing about a short series of events and describing actions, thoughts, and feelings
  • – Writing about opinions

What will grade two students learning in mathematics?

In grade two, Metropolitan School students extend their understanding of place value to the hundreds place. They use their place value understanding to solve word problems, including those involving length and other units of measure. Students will continue to work on their addition and subtraction skills, quickly and accurately adding and subtracting numbers up through 20 and also working with numbers up through 100. They will also build a foundation for understanding fractions by working with shapes and geometry. Activities in these areas will include:

  • – Quickly and accurately adding and subtracting numbers to 20
  • – Solving word problems by adding or subtracting numbers up through 100
  • – Understanding what the different digits mean in a three-digit number
  • – Adding and subtracting three digit numbers
  • – Measuring lengths of objects in standard units such as inches and centimeters
  • – Solving addition and subtraction word problems involving length
  • – Solving problems involving money
  • – Breaking up a rectangle into same-size squares
  • – Dividing circles and rectangles into halves, thirds, or fourths
  • – Solving addition, subtraction, and comparison word problems using information presented in a bar graph
  • – Writing equations to represent addition of equal numbers

What learning experiences do grade two students have with science, social studies, and specialist subjects?

The integration of science and social studies with English language arts and mathematics continues in grade two through Metropolitan School’s theme-based approach to teaching and learning in a homeroom setting.

Physical education, art, music, and French, as well as Arabic and religion studies as prescribed by Egypt Ministry of Education are taught within specialist classroom settings.

Grade Three


Grade three students experience another significant milestone in their education as they begin the transition from “learning to read” to “reading to learn”. At Metropolitan School grade three students begin using their reading skills to derive meaning from many different reading resources, to conduct research, prepare reports, and write stories.

What will grade three students learn in English language arts?

In grade three, Metropolitan School students build important reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. They think, talk, and write about what they read in a variety of articles, books, and other texts. In their writing, students will pay more attention to organizing information, developing ideas, and supporting these ideas with facts, details, and reasons. Activities in these areas will include:

  • – Reading a wide range of stories and describing how a story teaches a lesson
  • – Describing characters in a story and how their actions contributed to events
  • – Reading texts about history, social studies, or science and answering questions about what they learned
  • – Referring to information from illustrations such as maps or pictures as well as the words in a text to support their answers
  • – Learning the rules of spoken and written English
  • – Learning and using new words, including words related to specific subjects (such as science words)
  • – Participating in class discussions by listening, asking questions, sharing ideas, and building on the ideas of others
  • – Giving a class presentation on a topic or telling a story using relevant facts and details and speaking clearly
  • – Writing stories with dialogue and descriptions of character’s actions, thoughts, and feelings
  • – Gathering information from books, articles, and online sources to build understanding of a topic
  • – Writing research or opinion papers over extended periods of time

What will grade three students learn in mathematics?

Grade three students at Metropolitan School continue to build their concept of numbers, developing an understanding of fractions as numbers. They will learn the concepts behind multiplication and division and apply problem-solving skills and strategies for multiplying and dividing numbers up through 100 to solve word problems. Students will also make connections between the concept of the area of a rectangle and multiplication and addition of whole numbers. Activities in these areas will include:

  • – Understanding and explaining what it means to multiply or divide numbers
  • – Multiplying all one-digit numbers from memory (knowing their times table)
  • – Multiplying one-digit numbers by multiples of 10 (such as 20, 30, 40)
  • – Solving two-step word problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
  • – Understanding the concept of area
  • – Relating the measurement of area to multiplication and division
  • – Understanding fractions as numbers
  • – Understanding and identifying a fraction as a number on a number line
  • – Comparing the size of two fractions
  • – Expressing whole numbers as fractions and identifying fractions that are equal to whole numbers (for example, recognizing that 3⁄1 and 3 are the same number)
  • – Measuring weights and volumes and solving word problems involving these measurements
  • – Representing and interpreting data

What learning experiences do grade three students have with science, social studies, and specialist subjects?

Students in grade three at Metropolitan School continue to explore and expand their understanding of how science and social studies intersect English language arts and mathematics in solving real world problems. Students grow in their ability to work independently to design and develop projects.

Physical education, art, music, and French, as well as Arabic and religion studies, as prescribed by Egypt Ministry of Education, continue to be taught within specialist settings with increased emphasis on individual skill development and independent learning.

Grade Four


In grade four students at Metropolitan School students will solidify their “reading to learn” skills through increasingly complex reading materials and independent research projects. They will read a wide range of literature, including stories, plays, and poems. Additionally, they will read to learn information about history, the world, science, and other areas. Writing tasks in grade four may include stories, essays, reports, and persuasive papers.

What will students learn in grade four English language arts?

Grade four students at Metropolitan School will continue to build important reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. They will read more challenging literature, articles, and other sources of information and continue to grow their vocabulary. They will also be expected to clearly explain in detail what they have read by referring to details or information from the text. In writing, students will organize their ideas and develop topics with reasons, facts, details, and other information. Activities in these areas will include:

  • – Identifying the theme or main idea of a story, play, or poem
  • – Comparing stories from different cultures
  • – Explaining how an author uses facts, details, and evidence to support their points
  • – Reading and understanding information presented in charts, graphs, timelines, and other illustrations
  • – Learning the rules of spoken and written English
  • – Learning and using new words, including words related to specific subjects (such as science words)
  • – Participating in class discussions by listening, asking questions, sharing ideas, and building on the ideas of others
  • – Giving a class presentation on a topic or telling a story using relevant, organized facts and details and speaking clearly
  • – Writing stories with dialogue and descriptions of character’s actions,thoughts, and feelings
  • – Taking notes and organizing information from books, articles, and online sources to learn more about a topic
  • – Writing research or opinion papers over extended periods of time

What will grade four student learn in mathematics?

In grade four, Metropolitan School students use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to solve word problems, including problems involving measurement of volume, mass, and time. Students will continue to build their understanding of fractions—creating equal fractions, comparing the size of fractions, adding and subtracting fractions, and multiplying fractions by whole numbers. They will also start to understand the relationship between fractions and decimals. Activities in these areas will include:

  • – Adding and subtracting whole numbers up to 1 million quickly and accurately
  • – Solving multi-step word problems, including problems involving measurement and converting measurements from larger to smaller unit
  • – Multiplying and dividing multi-digit numbers
  • – Extending understanding of fractions by comparing the size of two fractions with different numerators (top numbers) and different denominators (bottom numbers)
  • – Creating equal fractions (3⁄4 = 3×2⁄4×2 = 6⁄8)
  • – Adding and subtracting fractions with the same denominator
  • – Building fractions from smaller fractions (3⁄8 = ⁄1  8 +⁄1  8 +⁄1  8)
  • – Connecting addition and subtraction of whole numbers to multiplying fractions by whole numbers
  • – Connecting addition of fractions to the concept of angle measurement
  • – Representing and interpreting data
  • – Converting fractions with denominators of 10 or 100 into decimals
  • – Locating decimals on a number line
  • – Comparing decimals and fractions using the symbols > (more than), = (equal to), and < (less than)

What learning experiences do grade four students have with science, social studies, and specialist subjects?

Students in grade four at Metropolitan School exercise their understanding of how science and social studies intersect, and complement, English language arts and mathematics through individual project-based learning, research reports, and critical analysis of reading sources.

Physical education, art, music, and French, as well as Arabic and religion studies, as prescribed by Egypt Ministry of Education, continue to be taught within specialist settings with increased emphasis on individual skill development and independent learning.

Grade Five


 

Fifth grade marks the beginning of a significant transition for students as they prepare for their entry into middle school in sixth grade. As this transition begins fifth graders at Metropolitan School are expected to work hard on projects and tasks that require them to draw on the skills and strategies they have been learning in elementary school. School work becomes more difficult, as teachers challenge students with long-term projects that require planning and organization. Fifth graders are asked to read a lot in a variety of subject areas. They will learn to analyze characters, plot, and settings, as well as to recognize an author’s purpose for writing and his organizational strategies. By reading all the time in their classrooms, in libraries, and at home, they will be able to find what they like to read. Reading for pleasure helps students build their vocabulary and fosters a lifelong love of literature, and of learning.

What will students learn in grade five English language arts?

Grade five students at Metropolitan School will read a wide range of materials, including literature from different times and cultures and informational text on grade-level topics in all subject areas. They practice the foundational reading skills learned in previous grades to read accurately and fluently, but the emphasis in fifth grade is on students’ comprehension of complex narrative and informational texts. Students read two or more texts on a topic and use a variety of comprehension strategies to compare, contrast, and integrate information from the texts. They analyze how structure, point of view, visual elements, and figurative language contribute to the meaning or tone of texts. As their text-analysis skills deepen, students are able to determine the main themes or points of text, understand how the author’s evidence and reasons support the theme or argument of the text, and draw inferences or conclusions supported by details from the text. They learn academic language and domain-specific vocabulary through their reading and use it in their writing and speaking.

In their writing, grade five students learn to group related information logically; use words, phrases, and clauses to link opinions to reasons and to connect ideas to related ideas; and use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop the story line or characters. They revise, edit, and rewrite their compositions and learn to try new approaches to improve their writing. Students conduct research projects that provide them with practice in gathering information, using print and digital sources, and summarizing information in notes.

Students engage effectively in collaborative discussions on fifth-grade topics and texts, identify and analyze logical fallacies in speakers’ presentations or from media sources, and learn to deliver speeches in which they state an opinion and support it with a logical sequence of evidence. They also learn to use gestures and expressions to convey meaning when they recite a section of a speech or poem or read from a historical or scientific document.

To support their writing and speaking, they learn the conventions of standard English grammar and usage, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation, such as commas and quotations to set off dialogue and correctly indicate titles of different kinds of documents and sources. Students learn to use print and digital reference materials to determine the correct pronunciation and meaning of words and to identify alternate word choices in all fifth-grade content areas.

What will grade five student learn in mathematics?

In grade five students at Metropolitan School will experience increasingly complex mathematics problems with complex numbers. They divide whole numbers, with and without remainders. They make connections between decimals, fractions, and percentages. They learn to multiply and divide fractions and to do the same operations using the powers of time. And, they apply these skills to the real world by solving problems about time, measurement, and money.

Activities in these areas include:

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • – Write and interpret numerical expressions.
  • – Analyze patterns and relationships.

Number and Operations in Base Ten

  • – Understand the place value system.
  • – Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths.

Number and Operations – Fractions

  • – Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions.
  • – Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to multiply and divide fractions.

Measurement and Data

  • – Convert like measurement units within a given measurement system.
  • – Represent and interpret data.
  • – Geometric measurement: understand concepts of volume and relate volume to multiplication and to addition.

Geometry

  • – Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
  • – Classify two-dimensional figures into categories based on their properties.

What learning experiences do grade five students have with science, social studies, and specialist subjects?

Fifth graders at Metropolitan School have become accomplished scientists who can observe and experiment to gather data and draw conclusions. Through our integrated, theme-based approach to core subject instruction fifth grade students have expanded their knowledge of the physical world and can apply the basic math and science skills they have acquired to their observations. In fifth grade, through their study of the history of the United States they are increasing their analytical and critical thinking skills, as they compare and contrast Native American and colonial experiences with present-day life, with a focus on the differing cultures of each original colony. Through their study of the founding of the United States they learn why people moved to the United States and they explore the routes and consequences of those movements, leading students to develop increasingly sophisticated skills in grasping the nuances of why people make the choices they make, and how their choices impact the evolvement and history of a country.

Grade five students will continue to experience physical education, art, music, and French, as well as Arabic and religion studies, as prescribed by Egypt Ministry of Education, in specialist-equipped classrooms.

What makes fifth grade unique in a student’s educational journey?

Two aspects of grade five create a unique moment in a student’s educational journey. First, grade five is the beginning of a significant transition for students, as they prepare to progress from elementary school where their core subjects are taught within the homeroom, to middle school where they will be required to transition from classroom to classroom for their subjects, which will be taught by subject area specialists. To prepare students for the transition to middle school a vigorous emphasis in fifth grade is placed on individual skill development and independent learning in all subjects with the goal of preparing students to self-manage successfully when they enter middle school, where they will be expected to handle increased levels of independence and responsibility with regards to arriving to class on time and organizing their studies to ensure they arrive in class ready to learn.

The second aspect of grade five that creates degrees of stress for students, and parents, is that students begin their journey to adulthood in grade five, as they begin to develop a self-identity and begin to stretch their wings socially. They think of themselves as mature and independent but can revert to immature behavior when they want the comfort they are often afraid to ask for. They spend much of their day learning the complex and ever-changing social rules for interacting with their peers. This can make it tough for teachers, who have to steer them back to the academic tasks of the classroom. It can also make it tough for some fifth graders, who may need to switch their focus from classroom social drama to good study skills and time management.

Fortunately, by this stage, fifth graders have developed the ability to think logically about concrete problems. This means that when they look at a problem, they can pull out the necessary facts and strategies needed to solve it, and then move those thoughts around in different ways until they are able to figure it out.

Being part of a group, what their friends think of them, and what they think of their friends are very important issues for fifth graders. Both boys and girls become more self-conscious and somewhat insecure about how they appear and whether they “fit in”. Struggles with schoolwork can often cause children to feel isolated from their peers, and embarrassed. Occasionally, students who excel in certain subjects try to downplay their intelligence in order to fit in.

At Metropolitan School we recognize the unique aspects of grade five and the importance of working with students and parents through this important transition, as we know that, in partnership, parents, guardians and teachers can play a critical role in listening, reassuring and supporting the new individual that is starting to emerge. We are intentional in our focus on this transition and committed to partnering with parents to ensure their child experiences a successful transition through grade five and into middle school.