Young minds require a solid foundation of knowledge to support future learning. Our Elementary School is designed to excite students, instilling a love of learning and priming them for success at an early age.

Expeditionary Learning ( What will students learn in the English Language Arts?)

The Expeditionary Learning K-12 Language Arts curriculum is a comprehensive, standards-based core literacy program that engages teachers and students through compelling, real world content. This highly-acclaimed curriculum draws on EL Education’s 25 years of experience in engaging teachers and students in active and meaningful learning.

The K-12 curriculum offers two hours of literacy instruction per day, depending on the grade level. At the heart of the curriculum, at all grade levels, are the hour-long module lessons. Each grade level includes four modules, which span a full school year. The four modules allow students to build important content knowledge based on a compelling topic related to science, social studies, or literature. Each module uses rich authentic texts throughout.

KG2-Grade 2

The last unit of each module, Unit 3, culminates with a performance task. This is where students have created their “magnificent thing” and are writing about it, bringing together what they know about tools, collaboration, and perseverance (and magnificent things!).:

What students learn in Units 1 and 2 helps them prepare for this performance task. (This is the principle of “backward design” in action.)

In Unit 1 students read, sing, discuss, dramatize, draw, and write to acquire strong content knowledge as well as the literacy skills that they need to do so. Students informational texts, learn how to ask and answer questions about the many texts they work with, and they learn to collaborate and converse with one another, capturing their thinking in pictures and words.

In Unit 2, they begin work with “close reading” of a complex text. In primary grades, this close reading happens through hearing the text read aloud (i.e., a close read-aloud). Teachers use a close read-aloud guide to conduct a series of sessions (across multiple lessons) that invite students to analyze and discuss this rich literary text. During the module lessons in this unit, students also do a series of design challenges that give them hands-on experience with collaborative problem solving.

As the lessons in each unit progress, teachers regularly check in on students’ progress. Each unit has a standards-based assessment built in. Here, students read, write, or speak with increasing independence about the texts they have been working with. These assessments help you in two ways: They allow you to have a clear sense of what your students can do and cannot yet do, and they give you valuable information about how best to use the time in the K-2 Skills Block to your students’ benefit.

Almost every day, K-2 students share songs and poems. These serve many functions: They give students cues about transitions from activity to activity, help build a positive classroom community, build fluency, give students opportunities to practice specific language standards, and give students a deep schema for rhythm and syntax. And, they are joyful.

This unfolding of the three units means that by Unit 3, when the performance task is introduced students are fully equipped to create their “magnificent things” and to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

KG2-G2 Links

https://www.engageny.org/

http://www.curriculum.eleducation.org

curriculum.eleducation.org

zearn.org

Razkids.com

 

 

Grade 3-Grade 6

The last unit of each module, Unit 3, includes the performance task: an extended, supported writing task or presentation where students need to successfully bring together what they know about this topic. This is where students are writing choose-your-own-adventure narratives, bringing together what they know about the armadillo and what defenses it has to help it survive (and what they know about writing).

In  Unit 1, students read, discuss, dramatize, draw, and write so that they acquire strong and specific content and background knowledge, as well as the literacy skills that they need to do so. Ms. Henderson’s fourth graders learn what “natural defenses” are, they learn what predators do, and they learn about the many kinds of defenses that animals have depending on their habitat. In the process, the students learn to read closely, reread carefully for meaning, gather evidence, and develop a paragraph.

In Unit 2, they take this basic understanding to a deeper level. They do more research and discuss with one another what defenses specific animals might have. With close support, they respond to a prompting question to write a full multi-paragraph essay about animal defenses.

Throughout, for homework, students are reading independently at their own level. They are using research texts to gather deeper and deeper knowledge about how animals use natural defenses to survive and thrive.

As the lessons in each unit progress, you have the opportunity to carefully check in on her students’ progress. Each unit has two built-in assessments: a mid-unit assessment (usually reading) and an end of unit assessment (usually writing). These assessments help you as the teacher in two ways: They allow you to have a clear sense of what her students can and cannot yet do, and they give you valuable information about how best to use the time in the ALL Block for your students’ benefit.

The grades 3-5 curriculum offers two hours of content-based literacy instruction per day with modules lessons and Guided Reading.

For Further details, kindly visit the link www.curriculum.eleducation.org  or www.commoncoresuccess.eleducation.org

G3 to G5 links

Engageny.org

zearn.org

Greatminds.org

Razkids.com

 

What will grade one students learn in mathematics?

Eureka Math

Eureka math—also known as Engage NY—is a complete K through 12 curriculum that carefully sequences the mathematical progressions into expertly crafted modules. Eureka provided educators with a comprehensive curriculum, in-depth professional development, books, and support materials.

Eureka math was written by a team of teachers and mathematicians who took great care to present mathematics in a logical progression from grade K – 12. This coherent approach allows teachers to know what incoming students already have learned and ensures that students are prepared for what comes next. When implemented faithfully, Eureka Math will dramatically reduce gas in student learning, instill persistence in problem solving, and prepare students to understand advanced math.

While many curricula and textbooks on the market today describe themselves as being ‘aligned” with the new standards, the content is virtually unchanged from the past. Eureka Math was developed specifically to meet the new standards and is the only comprehensive curriculum fully aligned with the standards for grades K-8, according to EdReports.org.

KG2

KG2 Grade mathematics is about developing understanding of the following topics covered in each module during an 80 minute instructional block:

Module Lessons

Module 1: Numbers to 10

Module 2: Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Shapes

Module 3: Comparison of Length, Weight, Capacity, and Numbers to 10

Module 4: Number Pairs, Addition and Subtraction to 10

Module 5: Numbers 10-20 and Counting to 100

Module 6: Analyzing, Compairing, and Composing Shapes

Grade 1

First Grade mathematics is about developing understanding of the following topics covered in each module during an 80 minute instructional block:

Module Lessons

Module 1: Sums and Differences to 10

Module 2: Introduction to Place Value Through Addition and Subtraction Within 20

Module 3: Ordering and Comparing Length Measurements as Numbers

Module 4: Place Value, Comparison, Addition and Subtraction to 40

Module 5: Identifying, Composing and Partitioning Shapes

Module 6: Place Value, Comparison, Addition and Subtraction to 100

Grade 2

Second Grade mathematics is about developing understanding of the following topics covered in each module during an 80 minute instructional block:

Module Lessons

Module 1: Sums and Differences to 100

Module 2: Addition and Subtraction of Length Units

Module 3: Place Value, Counting, and Comparison of Numbers to 1000

Module 4: Addition and Subtraction Within 200 with Word Problems to 100

Module 5: Addition and Subtraction Within 1000 with Word Problems to 100

Module 6: Founds of Multiplication and Division

Module 7: Problem Solving with Length, Money, and Data

Module 8: Time, Shapes, and Fractions as Equal Parts of Shapes

Grade 3

Third Grade mathematics is about developing understanding of the following topics covered in each module during an 80 minute instructional block:

Module Lessons

Module 1: Properties of Multiplication and Division and Solving Problems with Units of 2-5 and 10

Module 2: Place Value and Problem Solving with Units of Measure

Module 3: Multiplication and Division with Units of 0, 1, 6-9, and Multiples of 10

Module 4: Multiplication and Area

Module 5: Fractions as Numbers on the Number Line

Module 6: Collecting and Displaying Data

Module 7: Geometry and Measurement Word Problems

Grade 4

Fourth Grade mathematics is about developing understanding of the following topics covered in each module during an 80 minute instructional block:

Module Lessons

Module 1: Place Value, Rounding, and Algorithms for Addition and Subtraction

Module 2: Unit Conversions and Problem Solving with Metric Measurement

Module 3: Multi-Digit Multiplication and Division

Module 4: Angle Measure and Plane Figures

Module 5: Fractions Equivalence, Ordering, and Operations

Module 6: Decimal Fractions

Module 7: Exploring Multiplication

Grade 5

Fifth Grade mathematics is about developing understanding of the following topics covered in each module during an 80 minute instructional block:

Module Lessons

Module 1: Place Value and Decimal Fractions

Module 2: Multi-Digit Whole Number and Decimal Fraction Operations

Module 3: Addition and Subtraction of Fractions

Module 4: Multiplication and Division of Fractions and Decimal Fractions

Module 5: Addition and Multiplication with Volume and Area

Module 6: Problem Solving with the Coordinate Plane

Grade 6

Sixth Grade mathematics is about developing understanding of the following topics covered in each module during an 80 minute instructional block:

Module Lessons

Module 1: Ratios and Unit Rates

Module 2: Arithmetic Operations Including Dividing by a Fraction

Module 3: Rational Numbers

Module 4: Expressions and Equations

Module 5: Area, Surface Area, and Volume Problems

Module 6: Area, Surface Area, and Volume Problems

Module 7: Statistics

For Further details,kindly visit the link www.engageny.org

What learning experiences do grade one students have with science, social studies, and specialist subjects?

Social studies and science learning activities for students in grade one continue to be integrated with English language arts and mathematics through our theme-based approach to teaching and learning at within a homeroom setting while specialist subject instruction in physical education, art, music, and French, as well as Arabic and religion studies as prescribed by Egypt Ministry of Education is taught in specialist classroom settings.

What learning experiences do grade three students have with science, social studies, and specialist subjects?

French

Grade 1:

Children will use Salut Sophie, in continuity from Grade 1. The methods aim at progressively develop four linguistic skills in the learner. At the beginning of the year listening and speaking are put forward. Writing and reading are progressively introduced.

Communication skills are developed through

Regular features of the scheme focusing on the skills of listening and speaking include:

  • pair work dialogue practice
  • songs and rhymes (some devised especially for this scheme to reinforce the key language)
  • class surveys

The scheme focuses on a French pupil, Sophie, at an international school in Paris, and her friends. As the scheme unfolds, pupils will be introduced to Sophie, her family, her international classmates and her life. The characters have been carefully chosen to lend an international outlook to the scheme and include a family from francophone Senegal.

Grade 3 to Grade 5

The curriculum in grade 3, 4 and 5 is based on the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages).

The program is based on ZIG ZAG, a methodology for learning French as a Foreign Language. The program aim at developing 5 linguistic competencies, namely understanding (listening and reading), speaking and interacting and finally writing. It aims as well at developing the cultural knowledge and understating of the language and its speakers.

ZigZag aims at:

Developing first communicative competencies of the children,

Raise awareness of the universe of language,

Propose increasing competencies in reading and writing;

Open children on diversity and understanding of others;

Give children pleasure and interest in learning language.

Zig Zag considers fun and enjoyment as a key part of learning. Activities engage learners with their different senses using body, interaction and reflection. The methods promotes active learning as supported by the CEFRL.

Zig Zag tells the story of Felix, a young reporter that travel the world and transport children introducing his friends.

Grade 6

From Grade 6, and in continuity with Grade 5, French lessons are based on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. It follows its four main objectives: Listen, speak and discuss with the target language; read and write in the target language; know and understand the language; discover social and intellectual aspects of the language.

We are using the FLE method PIXEL. In this approach, and in agreement with the CEFRL, language is seen and used as an action and communication tool. Learning is a path to communication and understanding how the language work. Learners are supported in using the language in communication situation. It supports as well learners in thinking the language to better understand its structures and become independent when using it.

The methods aims at promoting a natural learning of the language by using topics realistic, with relevant situation relevant to young learners as they are inspired by situation they can encounter. The topics and situation are similar to topics and situations learners can encounter or live every day.

The learning is based on a four stages process, awareness, conceptualization, systematization in the use of the language and appropriation.

The method covers various topics introducing key vocabulary and structures. These are school environment, friendship and invitation to a party, family, hobbies, the city and exploring the world to explore, geography time and weather.

PIXEL is a great tool to learn the language and prepare for the DELF, allowing acknowledging the progress of our learners in the discovery of the language.

 

Science

Grade 1

The performance expectations in first grade help students formulate answers to questions such as: “What happens when materials vibrate? What happens when there is no light? What are some ways plants and animals meet their needs so that they can survive and grow? How are parents and their children similar and different? What objects are in the sky and how do they seem to move?” First grade performance expectations include PS4, LS1, LS3, and ESS1 Disciplinary Core Ideas from the NRC Framework . Students are expected to develop understanding of the relationship between sound and vibrating materials as well as between the availability of light and ability to see objects. The idea that light travels from place to place can be understood by students at this level through determining the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light. Students are also expected to develop understanding of how plants and animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs as well as how behaviors of parents and offspring help the offspring survive. The understanding is developed that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly the same as, their parents. Students are able to observe, describe, and predict some patterns of the movement of objects in the sky. The crosscutting concepts of patterns; cause and effect; structure and function; and influence of engineering, technology, and science on society and the natural world are called out as organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas. In the first grade performance expectations, students are expected to demonstrate grade-appropriate proficiency in planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, constructing explanations and designing solutions, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. Students are expected to use these practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas.

Grade 2

The performance expectations in second grade help students formulate answers to questions such as: “How does land change and what are some things that cause it to change? What are the different kinds of land and bodies of water? How are materials similar and different from one another, and how do the properties of the materials relate to their use? What do plants need to grow? How many types of living things live in a place?” Second grade performance expectations include PS1, LS2, LS4, ESS1, ESS2, and ETS1 Disciplinary Core Ideas from the NRC Framework . Students are expected to develop an understanding of what plants need to grow and how plants depend on animals for seed dispersal and pollination. Students are also expected to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. An understanding of observable properties of materials is developed by students at this level through analysis and classification of different materials. Students are able to apply their understanding of the idea that wind and water can change the shape of the land to compare design solutions to slow or prevent such change.  Students are able to use information and models to identify and represent the shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water in an area and where water is found on Earth. The crosscutting concepts of patterns; cause and effect; energy and matter; structure and function; stability and change; and influence of engineering, technology, and science on society and the natural world are called out as organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas. In the second grade performance expectations, students are expected to demonstrate grade appropriate proficiency in developing and using models, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, constructing explanations and designing solutions, engaging in argument from evidence, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. Students are expected to use these practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas.

Grade 3 

The performance expectations in third grade help students formulate answers to questions such as: “What is typical weather in different parts of the world and during different times of the year? How can the impact of weather-related hazards be reduced? How do organisms vary in their traits? How are plants, animals, and environments of the past similar or different from current plants, animals, and environments? What happens to organisms when their environment changes? How do equal and unequal forces on an object affect the object? How can magnets be used?” Third grade performance expectations include PS2, LS1, LS2, LS3, LS4, ESS2, and ESS3 Disciplinary Core Ideas from the NRC Framework . Students are able to organize and use data to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season. By applying their understanding of weather-related hazards, students are able to make a claim about the merit of a design solution that reduces the impacts of such hazards. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the similarities and differences of organisms’ life cycles. An understanding that organisms have different inherited traits, and that the environment can also affect the traits that an organism develops, is acquired by students at this level. In addition, students are able to construct an explanation using evidence for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing. Students are expected to develop an understanding of types of organisms that lived long ago and also about the nature of their environments. Third graders are expected to develop an understanding of the idea that when the environment changes some organisms survive and reproduce, some move to new locations, some move into the transformed environment, and some die. Students are able to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object and the cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other. They are then able to apply their understanding of magnetic interactions to define a simple design problem that can be solved with magnets. The crosscutting concepts of patterns; cause and effect; scale, proportion, and quantity; systems and system models; interdependence of science, engineering, and technology; and influence of engineering, technology, and science on society and the natural world are called out as organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas. In the third grade performance expectations, students are expected to demonstrate grade-appropriate proficiency in asking questions and defining problems; developing and using models, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, constructing explanations and designing solutions, engaging in argument from evidence, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. Students are expected to use these practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas.

Arabic

At Metropolitan we do focus on the setting a strong Arabic language foundation from an early age. Students are exposed to the Arabic literature, poems and heritage.

Objectives of Arabic curriculum:

1) Instilling a love of learning language, developing an efficient presentational skills from an early age and comprehending the Egyptian language with all its phonetics, and terms in an attractive teaching strategy.

2)  The students are capable to read and write profoundly, and communicate with others using the right Arabic terms and expressions.

3) Developing the artistic taste of the language and understanding all aspects of uniqueness in the language.

4) Developing the student’s handwriting and dictation skills.

5) Aiding the students to comprehend the complexity of the Arabic grammar and allowing him/her to work on intensively.

That would be applied through:

1) The Arabic reading stories and syllabus

2) The comprehension content and what is involved in terms of selection of Imaginative and grammar phrases.

3)  Rules of dictation

4)  Composition and reading paragraphs

5)  Planning for free reading

6)  Lesson practices

7)  Activities and exams

Art

Art and design embodies some of the highest forms of human creativity. We aim to provide a high-quality art and design education that will engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they will be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design.

They will also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation. Pupils will be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

Pupils will be taught:

  • To create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas
  • To improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials [for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay]
  • About great artists, architects and designers in history.

Music

Metropolitan has a uniquely-crafted music curriculum that comprises multiple music education disciplines and integrates Western musical doctrine with local and global musical traditions. MetMusic is geared towards inspiring students to explore music and use performing arts as a means of self-expression, culture, and entertainment.

Our curriculum begins with helping students to assimilate proper music terminology with their own descriptions of music. As students grow, so grow their musical vocabularies and fluency of music theory.

The four governing pedagogies that guide our curriculum’s construction are Orff-Schulwerk, Kodaly, Dalcroze, and California State Content Standards. Of these schools of thought, Metropolitan selected the most pertinent and the most research-supported elements.

Our curriculum is designed for all students to be able to grow musically by allowing the students to learn music as they would learn a language: immersion and association.  Our pedagogical methods are play-focused and performance-focused. Students will have multiple shows to be working towards in their music classes which give real-world applications to the skills they are learning in class, and which also give students performance experience.

Metropolitan students are free to experiment with music in our well-equipped music rooms. Students are surrounded by music theory, accomplished musical artists, and a plethora of instruments to inspire their curiosity and inspire their creativity.